Case Study: Seminar Series

Like speakers invited to conferences, seminar series and colloquia speakers are carefully curated so as to showcase to the members of a department the latest developments in the field. If unmonitored, these too can suffer from unintentional, but nevertheless harmful biases.

Below are (encouraging) data from neuroscience series at several top institutions, covering the last 4-5 years worth of speakers. The specific seminar series tallied is listed in parentheses next to each institution name. As all seminars are general neuroscience seminar series, the comparison base rate is that of neuroscience (currently 24%; Dec 2016).

Harvard (Center for Brain Science Seminar Series)
2016-2017: 7 Women: 22 Men (24.1%)
2015-2016: 8 Women: 26 Men (23.5%)
2014-2015: 8 Women: 15 Men (34.8%)
2013-2014: 6 Women: 15 Men (28.6%)
2012-2013: 3 Women: 15 Men (16.7%)
[3 out of 5 years at or above the 2016 base rate]

Johns Hopkins (Neuroscience Research Seminar)
2016-2017: 8 Women: 14 Men (36.4%)
2015-2016: 8 Women: 19 Men (29.6%)
2014-2015: 7 Women: 22 Men (24.1%)
2013-2014: 6 Women: 19 Men (24%)
2012-2013: no data
[4 out of 4 years at or above the 2016 base rate]

National Institutes of Health (NIH Neuroscience Seminar Series)
2016-2017: 9 Women: 24 Men (27.3%)
2015-2016: 8 Women: 17 Men (32%)
2014-2015: 8 Women: 16 Men (33.3%)
2013-2014: 6 Women: 11 Men (35.3%)
2012-2013: 5 Women: 14 Men (26.3%)
[5 out of 5 years at or above the 2016 base rate]

Princeton (Neuroscience Seminar Series)
2016-2017: 6 Women: 6 Men (50%)
2015-2016: 5 Women: 9 Men (35.7%)
2014-2015: 4 Women: 12 Men (25%)
2013-2014: 3 Women: 4 Men (42.9%)
2012-2013: no data
[4 out of 4 years at or above the 2016 base rate]

Stanford (Stanford Neurosciences Institute)
2016-2017 (Fall only): 1 Women: 8 Men (11.1%)
2015-2016: 12 Women: 19 Men (38.7%)
2014-2015: 10 Women: 23 Men (30.3%)
2013-2014: 12 Women: 19 Men (38.7%)
2012-2013: 11 Women: 19 Men (36.7%)
[4 out of 5 years at or above the 2016 base rate]

UCLA (Joint Seminars in Neuroscience)
2016-2017: 11 Women: 15 Men (42.3%)
2015-2016: 5 Women: 12 Men (29.4 %)
2014-2015: 4 Women: 7 Men (36.4 %)
2013-2014: 8 Women: 18 Men (30.8 %)
2012-2013: 5 Women: 23 Men (17.9%)
[4 out of 5 years at or above the 2016 base rate]

UCSD (Neuroscience Seminar Series)
2016-2017: 12 Women: 17 Men (41.4%)
2015-2016: 9 Women: 16 Men (36%)
2014-2015: 6 Women: 22 Men (21.4%)
2013-2014: 7 Women: 19 Men (26%)
2012-2013: 12 Women: 20 Men (37.5%)
[4 out of 5 years at or above the 2016 base rate]

UCSF (Neuroscience Formal Seminar Series)
2016-2017: 7 Women: 11 Men (38.9%)
2015-2016: 5 Women: 15 Men (25%)
2014-2015: 7 Women: 13 Men (35%)
2013-2014: 5 Women: 16 Men (23.8%)
2012-2013: 4 Women: 18 Men (18.2%)
[3 out of 5 years at or above the 2016 base rate]

 

Advertisements