#BWNFridayPost: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) Toolkit

Link to the website

EDI-toolkit is an amazing resource for definitions of EDI, research behind its importance, and various plans for improving EDI in neuroscience. This set of tools was developed alongside and based off of resources from the Human Brain Project, and includes guidelines for EDI in project governance, and in various parts of research development.

BrainConf: Synaptic Plasticity

Conference link
September 27-30, 2022

Organisers: Université de Bordeaux, Daniel Choquet, Laurent Groc, Aude Panatier

Total talks gender ratio: 14 Women: 21 Men (40%)
Estimated base rate of women in the field: 33%*
BWN rating: 3, within 1 standard deviation above base rate

**Method of estimation: previously established base rate of women in the molecular neuroscience field

#BWNFridayPost: Quantifying hierarchy and dynamics in US faculty hiring and retention

Link to the paper

Here is a link to a twitter thread by one of the authors

This paper by K. Hunter Wapman, Sam Zhang, Aaron Clauset, & Daniel B. Larremore evaluates the dynamics of various aspects of academia hiring in the US, and the extreme inequalities of this process. In a section of this study, they also find that while there are gains for women’s representation in academia in most subjects, these improvements are mostly a result of demographic turnover and earlier hiring changes. Thus, they suggest, that without further changes long-term gender parity in most fields will likely not be achieved.

They also have numerous other findings, such as that a small set of universities produce most of the US-hired professors, and that there is a higher attrition rate among non-US trained faculty.

#BWNFridayPost – Alba Network: Towards Diversity and Equity in Brain Sciences

Photo by DS stories on Pexels.com

This week’s BWN Friday Post brings you the Alba Network, a team and network dedicated to promoting diversity and equity in the brain sciences. They have so many amazing resources and so much information on their website, but we especially wanted to highlight their resources section (particularly their guide for organizing a diverse conference), as well their many working groups! Check out the website, share their resources, and get involved here!

Bernstein Conference 2022

Conference link
September 13-16, 2022

Organisers:
Raoul-Martin Memmesheimer, Christian Machens, Tatjana Tchumachenko, Moritz Helias, Anna Levina, Megan Carey, Brent Doiron, Tatiana Engel, Ann Hermundstad, Christian Leibold, Timothy O’Leary, Srdjan Ostojic, Cristina Savin, Mark van Rossum, Friedemann Zenke

Total speakers/talks gender ratio: 8 Women: 12 Men (40%)
Estimated base rate of women in the field: 26%*
BWN rating: 4, within or at 2 standard deviation above base rate

*Method of estimation: previously established base rate of women in the computational neuroscience field

#BWNFridayPost – Expanding DEI to Disability: Opportunities for Biological Psychiatry

Photo by Karolina Grabowska on Pexels.com

This week’s BWN Friday Post brings you a paper by Perry Zurn, Joseph Stramondo, Joel Reynolds, and Dani Bassett. In it, they discuss the importance of expanding DEI efforts within the field of biological psychiatry to include disability justice, what has been done so far, and concrete recommendations to continue working upon this going forward.

Read the full paper here.

Neuromatch Conference 2022

Conference link

September 27-28, 2022

Organisers:
Dan Goodman, Konrad Kordin, Brad Wyble, Titipat Achakulvisut, Chris Rozell, Yiota Poirazi, Megan Peters, Bing Brunton, Anne Urai, Jennifer Bizley, Alberto Antonietti, Jeremy Forest, John Butler

Keynote speakers gender ratio: 2 Women: 2 Men (50%)
Estimated base rate of women in the field: 26%*
BWN rating: 3, within or at 1 standard deviation above base rate

*Method of estimation: previously established base rate of women in the computational neuroscience field

#BWNFridayPost – How Can We Make Music Science Studies More Diverse?

Photo from Unsplash

This week’s BWN Friday Post brings you an article by Eva Amsen, titled “Neuroscientists Want To Make Music Science Studies More Diverse.” In it, she highlights the conversation between this paper and this response, in which the authors discuss how many music science studies focus on the way the brain processes Western music–without considering other musical forms–and do not recruit diverse enough participants (with relation to the type of music they listen to). These papers, as well as Amsen’s article, discuss how that can be changed and why it’s important.

Read the article here.