SAN2022: Society of Applied Neuroscience 2022

Conference link

September 15-17, 2022

Organisers:
Society of Applied Neuroscience
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

Invited (+ keynote) speakers gender ratio: 2 Women: 4 Men (33%)
Estimated base rate of women in the field: 43%*
BWN rating: 2, within 1 standard deviation below base rate

*Method of estimation: previously established base rate of women in the neuroscience field

#BWNFridayPost – Gender and geographical disparity in editorial boards of journals in psychology and neuroscience

This week’s BWN Friday Post brings you a paper by Eleanor Palser, Maia Lazerwitz, and Aikaterini Fotopoulou titled “Gender and geographical disparity in editorial boards of journals in psychology and neuroscience.” They investigated the makeup of the editorial boards of several journals, and found that there is a disproportionate amount of editors from the US compared to other countries, as well as a disproportionate amount of male editors vs female ones.

Read the article here.

Conference on Cognitive Computational Neuroscience 2022

Conference link

Organisers:
Thomas Naselaris, Hendrikje Nienborg, Russ Poldrack, Michael J. Tarr, Megan Peters, Leyla Isik, Gunnar Blohm, Jennifer Lieberman, Leila Wehbe, Julian Jara-Ettinger, Aldo Faisal, Jana Shaich Borg, Judy Fan

Invited (keynote) speakers gender ratio: 6 Women: 7 Men (46%)
Estimated base rate of women in the field: 35%*
BWN rating: 3, i.e. within 1 standard deviation above estimated base rate

*Method of estimation: previously established base rate of women in the fields of computational neuroscience and cognitive neuroscience

AI, Neuroscience and Hardware: From Neural to Artificial Systems and Back Again

Conference link

Organisers:
Sach Mukherjee, DZNE, Germany
Sachin Ranade, Nature Neuroscience, USA
Stefan Remy, DZNE, Germany
Joachim Schultze, DZNE, Germany
Owain Vaughan, Nature Electronics, UK
Liesbeth Venema, Nature Machine Intelligence, Germany
Natacha Cruz, Nature Research, USA
Hannah Mertens, DZNE, Germany

Invited speakers gender ratio: 8 Women: 9 Men (47%)
Estimated base rate of women in the field: 23.8%*
BWN rating: 5 (i.e. more than 2 stdev above base rate)

*Method of estimation: previously established base rate of women in the fields of neurally inspired machine learning and neural structure and brain modelling

Molecular Mechanisms of Neuronal Connectivity

Conference link

Organisers:
Catherine Collins, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
Rüdiger Klein, Max-Planck Institute of Neurobiology, Germany
Kang Shen, Stanford University
Yimin Zou, University of California San Diego

Invited speakers (and session chairs) gender ratio: 7 Women: 9 Men (44%)
Estimated base rate of women in the field: 33%*
BWN rating: 3 (i.e. 1 standard deviation above base rate)

*Method of estimation: previously established base rate of women in the field of molecular neuroscience

an image of cold spring harbor laboratory, where the conference will be held

LabLinks: Decision-making: From molecular to cognitive neuroscience

Conference link

Organisers:
Athena Akrami, Sainsbury Wellcome Centre
Christina Konen, Editor, Neuron
Nikolay Tsanov, Editor, Cell Reports
Rita Gemayel, Editor, Cell Reports

Invited speakers gender ratio: 2 Women: 7 Men (22%)
Estimated base rate of women in the field: 35%*
BWN rating: 2 (i.e. 1 standard deviation below base rate)

*Method of estimation: previously established base rate of women in the fields of molecular and cognitive neuroscience.

#BWNFridayPost – Based on billions of words on the internet, PEOPLE = MEN.

Image from Unsplash

This week’s BWN Friday Post brings you a new paper from April Bailey and colleagues on the gender bias even when gender-neutral terms are used, titled: “Based on billions of words on the internet, PEOPLE=MEN“.

Read the paper here.

You can also find a Twitter thread by the lead author, April Bailey, discussing the research here.

https://mobile.twitter.com/BiasWatchNeuro/status/1521915805830578176

#BWNFridayPost – The illusion of diversity: We consistently overestimate the presence of individuals from minority groups.

Image from Unsplash

This week’s BWN Friday Post brings you a new paper from Rasha Kardosh and colleagues on the illusion of diversity, titled: “Minority salience and the overestimation of individuals from minority groups in perception and memory“.

Read the paper here.

You can also find a Twitter thread by one of authors discussing the research here.